Advertisement

Mainers warned about Spotted Lanternfly

Invasive Spotted Lanternfly Egg Masses Found in Our State
Published: Sep. 30, 2020 at 10:58 AM EDT
Email this link
Share on Pinterest
Share on LinkedIn

AUGUSTA, Maine (WABI) - A bug that attacks more than 100 species of trees, shrubs, and vines is is being spotted in Maine.

Maine DACF warning about invasive Spotted Lanternfly after egg masses were spotted on trees in several towns in Maine.
Maine DACF warning about invasive Spotted Lanternfly after egg masses were spotted on trees in several towns in Maine.(Maine DACF)

According to the Maine Department of Agricultural, Conservation and Forestry, egg masses from the spotted lanternfly were found on trees in Northeast Harbor, Boothbay, Freeport, and Yarmouth. No live insects have been spotted to date.

The pest has the potential to impact apples, peaches, grapes, maple syrup, as well as the ornamental nursery industry.

Maine DACF warning about invasive Spotted Lanternfly after egg masses were spotted on trees in several towns in Maine.
Maine DACF warning about invasive Spotted Lanternfly after egg masses were spotted on trees in several towns in Maine.(Maine DACF)

They feed on sap. The bug is described as gray, about one inch long, with black spots and red under the wings. The egg masses are rectangular and yellowish-brown, covered with a gray waxy coating.

Maine DACF warning about invasive Spotted Lanternfly after egg masses were spotted on trees in several towns in Maine.
Maine DACF warning about invasive Spotted Lanternfly after egg masses were spotted on trees in several towns in Maine.(Maine DACF)

Residents are being urged to report any sign of the invasive insect especially if you receive outdoor products from states known to have spotted lanternfly infestations. There are currently known populations of SLF in Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia.

“These most recent finds call attention to the fact that there are many ways that spotted lanternfly can travel here from other states,” said State Horticulturist, Gary Fish. “Early detection plays an important role in the protection of our state’s economic and ecological resources from invasive species, and we ask anyone who may have received shipments of wood, ornamental plants, or any other materials from Pennsylvania or other Northeastern states to help protect the natural resources and agricultural industries of Maine by checking for and reporting any signs of spotted lanternfly.”

Maine DACF warning of invasive spotted lanternfly after egg masses were located in Boothbay, Yarmouth, Northeast Harbor and Freeport.
Maine DACF warning of invasive spotted lanternfly after egg masses were located in Boothbay, Yarmouth, Northeast Harbor and Freeport.(Maine DACF)

You’re asked to take a photo and email it to bugwatch@maine.gov.

Copyright 2020 WABI. All rights reserved.

Latest News

Latest News